Prescriptions

Doctor writing a prescription

Ordering Your Prescription

Repeat prescriptions can be ordered:

  • Online
  • Putting your request in the box provided at the reception
  • Telephoning the prescription order line (0191) 460 2404 between 11am and 2pm Monday to Friday
  • By post
  • By arrangement with the local pharmacy

Since all prescriptions must be authorised by a doctor, we would ask that you give at least 48 hours (2 working days) notice when requesting a repeat prescription.  It is your responsibility to ensure that you do not run out of medication.

Prescriptions can be collected during the practice's opening hours and the patient's details will be verified before the prescription is handed out.

Prescriptions will not be given to anyone under the age of 14 years.

If a SAE (Self Addressed Envelope) is left with the request, we can post out the prescription.
Please only order the medications you need, to avoid waste and stock piling. Prescriptions should only be ordered within 7 days of their due date. Only in exception circumstances, e.g. holidays, should they be ordered early.

Repeat prescriptions are authorised at the discretion of the doctor. Please also note the review date printed after the list of medications on the right hand side of your prescription- we may refuse to sign prescriptions until you have been reviewed once this date has passed.

Collect at your Pharmacy Service

We can arrange for your prescription to be collected by your local pharmacist.
Once set up, you simply need to order your prescription by telephone or by putting your request in the prescription box at reception, and your medicines will be ready for collection at your pharmacist 48 hours later, saving you the need to collect the signed prescription and wait for the pharmacist to dispense it.

To set up this service, simply talk to the receptionists. All subsequent prescriptions will automatically be sent to your chosen pharmacist.

You may change your pharmacist or cancel this service at any time (obviously not after a prescription has been issued and sent to the pharmacist).

This service is dependant upon your pharmacy participating in this scheme and all repeat prescriptions are at the discretion of the doctor. Please check with your pharmacy or the receptionist can help you with this.

Are your monthly medicines always the same?

If your repeat medication rarely changes, then you might be suited to a service called “repeat dispensing”. With the Doctor’s agreement, a prescription would be generated that can run for up to a year (usually 6 months). Your chosen pharmacist holds this prescription and you simply contact them before your current supply runs out so that they can give you further medication.

When the last repeat is dispensed, the pharmacy should prompt you to contact the surgery and arrange for a medical review. If you and your doctor agree that repeat dispensing is still appropriate, a new prescription is generated which you can either take back to the same pharmacist, or to any other participating in the scheme.

While the repeat dispensing prescription is still active, which can be for up to 12 months, you will not need to go back to the surgery for further supplies of your usual medicines. If you are otherwise unwell, then you simply arrange to see your doctor in the usual way. Remember that the pharmacist is always available to ask you how you are getting on with your repeat medication and to answer any drug queries that you may have.

Our experience with the scheme so far has been very positive. Patients have told us that it saves them time having to order prescriptions and take them to the pharmacist. It helps us by reducing the pressure on reception and helps the pharmacist who can plan what stocks they need to keep.

Going to Hospital?

Whenever you go to hospital, make sure that you take an up to date list of your medication with you (or the medication itself). You will find a list of your repeat medication on the right hand side of the prescription.

Whilst no-one likes to think that they may have an accident or fall ill, if there is an emergency it may not always be possible for the hospital to find out what medication you are taking. Perhaps you could consider keeping a list of your medication in your jacket pocket or handbag.